University of California

Book Reviews


 Title Tropical and Subtropical Fruits: Postharvest Physiology, Processing and Packaging
 
 Author/Editor Muhammad Siddiq (editor), Jasim Ahmed, Maria Gloria Lobo, and Ferhan Ozadali (associate editors)
 
 Additional Information

Wiley-Blackwell, Ames, Iowa, USA, 648p.   (Hard cover ISBN: 978-0-8138-1142-0);
 http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0813811422.html


 
 Review This book is written by 66 authors, including the four editors, who are experts in various aspects of postharvest physiology, processing and packaging of tropical and subtropical fruits. It is organized into 31 chapters that are grouped in five parts. Part I covers the following topics: Introduction and overview, Postharvest physiology and storage, Enzymes in quality and processing, Phytochemicals and bioactive compounds, Novel processing technologies, Quality management, and Current and innovative packaging technologies. Parts II to V cover tropical fruits (banana, coconut, dates, guava, longans and carambola, lychee, mango, papaya, passion fruit, and pineapple); subtropical fruits-citrus group (grapefruit, lemon and lime, oranges, tangerine, mandarin and clementine); subtropical fruits-noncitrus group (avocado, figs, kiwifruit, olives and olive oil, pomegranate, and watermelon, cantaloupe and honeydew); and lesser known tropical and subtropical fruits (acerola, cashew apple, cherimoya, pitanga, dragon fruit, durian, jujube, and loquat. For each fruit species, the following topics are presented: current storage and shipping practices; shelf life extension and quality; microbial issues and food safety aspects of fresh-cut products; processing operations such as grading, cleaning, size-reduction, blanching, filling, canning, freezing, and drying; and effects of processing on nutrients and bioavailability.

Overall, this book is a very good addition to reference books about tropical and subtropical fruits and is recommended for researchers, students, and fruit industry professionals. It can also be used as a textbook for an upper division undergraduate or graduate course on tropical and subtropical fruits if it is offered in a lower cost format (such as soft cover and/or electronic formats).


 
 Date 2012
 
 Reviewed By Adel Kader
 
College of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences
Postharvest Technology Center
Department of Plant Sciences

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